Our Estates Gazette Article: Data Driven Property Development

land finding with data
Land Insight in Estates Gazette

 

Our CEO, Jonny, once again finding a place to spout his mouth off  😉 , ahem, to wax lyrical about property and technology. This time his article is in the Estates Gazette where he talks about the new waves of data that are entering the property industry and how they will change patterns of site finding behaviour.

You can find the article here: http://www.egi.co.uk/news/an-insight-into-catching-data/

Enjoy 🙂

 

 

The state of open land data in the UK

The UK Government has many databases relating to land use information and many government organisations that look after them. The DCLG created a map displaying all assets owned by the UK Government. That project no longer exists. I can only guess because of budget cuts. Collating all of that data from so many public bodies is a difficult task and keeping it up to date is even harder.

Let’s take a look at the major data-sets available for land that is potentially available land for development.

Find Me Some Government Space
Find Me Some Government Space is an excellent tool for finding land and property for sale or rent. It could be even better if the all of this data is open. Read our campaign.

National Land Use Database of Previously Developed Land (NLUD-PDL)
It’s a large database of around 23,000 brownfield sites across England published by the Homes & Communities Agency. Shame latest site data is from 2009

Land Registry – Land Sale Prices
The Land Registry keeps the official records for land ownership in the UK. The Land Registry publishes a lot of open data. This data is incredibly useful for gaining insight into the housing market. The Land Registry decided to publish price paid data for residential property sales, but decided not to do the same for land sales. Why? Having the same data for land would increase transparency like it has done in the property industry. Read our campaign.

Site allocations
Each council in the UK is required by law to have a Local Plan, as part of that site allocations is an important document. Site allocation documents are published on each councils respective websites. Information about the status of each site is not easy to find. 

So that’s a lot of data, none of which is up-to-date and easily accessible.

Please refer to the land data sources spreadsheet for a more comprehensive list of open data-sets.

In order to get some or all of this data on the map, we’re going to be talking with various organisations to open up data and try and keep it up-to-date. We’ve set-up data campaigns so you can keep track of our progress.

Have I missed a useful open data-set? Tweet us or write a comment below.